Human Impacts: impacts of us humans on our planet, our own and all the other species, whether due to our number or how we live

Some people debate whether consumption (in generally rich countries) is a bigger environmental concern than population growth (in generally poorer countries). TooMuchTooMany is not concerned with this debate; the answer will never be agreed and the question acts as a distraction from looking at the effects of these issues. TooMuchTooMany looks at these two issues in one topic: Human Impacts.

Mapungubwe Hill, capital of the sophisticated Iron Age Mapangubwe Kingdom, which traded with countries as far afield as China and was first inhabited around 1220
Mapungubwe Hill, capital of the sophisticated Iron Age Mapangubwe Kingdom, which traded with countries as far afield as China and was first inhabited around 1220

Some people believe the world can “cope” with increased Human Impacts by, for instance, locating new resources to mine and developing more intensive agricultural methods and other technologies.  TooMuchTooMany looks at impacts on the ground to see what “cope” means and whether coping is good enough. 

If demand for coal mined in South Africa increases and a new mine opens, there will be impacts on South Africa; some positive, some negative. Whether increased demand is down to more South African (or non-South African) consumers or the same number of consumers consuming more, there will be Human Impacts.  One recent new mining area in South Africa is within the Mapungubwe UNESCO World Heritage Site.  So new sources of coal can be found, like Mapungubwe, TooMuchTooMany looks at what “cope” might mean – what will we have to lose to cope with increased consumption and people growth, in other words, with increased Human Impacts.